Why the New Mumps Outbreak Puts You At Risk

Robert J. Rowen, MD

March 3, 2010

Did you have the mumps when you were a child? If so, it’s one of the best ways to avoid the mumps now that you’re older. If you didn’t have the mumps, you could be at serious risk for contracting the childhood disease – even if you’ve had the vaccine.As you may know, I’ve decried vaccines for decades. Why? They’re toxic (they inject poisonous additives into you), they deny children their needed usual infections to develop a robust immune system, and now there’s a third reason. Vaccines may not last a lifetime. And if they don’t, you could contract the disease as an adult. Think it won’t happen? Think again.

Last week, at least 1,521 people in New York and New Jersey developed mumps. About 85% of the victims had the usual two doses of the MMR vaccine. What have they gotten for it? So far, 55 cases of swollen and painful testicles, five cases of pancreatitis, two cases of meningitis, one case of temporary deafness, one case of Bell’s palsy, and one case of inflamed ovaries.

Mumps is a relatively benign disease in kids. It is far more problematic in adults. One fear is damaged testicles leading to sterility, which is probably an overblown risk (and something most men over 65 don’t worry about too much). The other complications mentioned above are also well known.

Of course, the pundits’ reaction is to recommend a third vaccine. This will raise the risk of immune reactions. And it will fill you with toxic substances.

But why would you want a third vaccine? Vaccines may not give life-long immunity, as does the wild virus. Furthermore, lifelong immunity might be fostered by repeated exposure to the wild virus circulating every few years and giving your immune system a memory boost. With the wild virus largely removed, large swaths of the population might lose immunity over time and when re-exposed, develop disease or at least become spreading carriers.

This becomes particularly worrisome with measles. Why? Measles is pretty rough on kids. I had it when I was a kid and I remember it very well. I was real sick. But like most all kid, I recovered quite well on my own. I shudder to think of an adult getting measles. Complications are far more common and severe. Were such an outbreak to occur amongst adults whose immunity waned, it could be catastrophic.

If you or a loved one does get mumps, measles, or even chicken pox, I recommend an immediate ozone treatment, ultraviolet blood irradiation therapy, or a high-dose vitamin C IV. It sure worked for the few cases of mumps I saw in Alaska.

I’ve said before, please know where your closest oxidative physician is. If you are exposed to a childhood disease and become symptomatic, oxidation or high dose IV vitamin C could bring a quick resolution without complications. I am against vaccination. I would much rather treat an acute infection than the awful complications of vaccines. This includes the flu vaccine.

Ref: Web MD, February 11, 2010.

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